Roslyn Shops pre 1907

Laurenson's Bakery - Mann, Bookseller - Sherriff, Butcher - Clarkson, Hairdresser [Photograph (K168) courtesy of Mr Grant Sherriff - Roslyn]

Laurenson’s Bakery – Mann, Bookseller – Sherriff, Butcher – Clarkson, Hairdresser
[Photograph (K168) courtesy of Mr Grant Sherriff – Roslyn]

Continue reading

Roslyn shops and shop keepers recalled in 1969

An area of the city which is losing some of its rather special character as buildings are being replaced by new is the Roslyn Township. The little dairy on the far right, which is more than 100 years old, has just been demolished.

An area of the city which is losing some of its rather special character as buildings are being replaced by new is the Roslyn Township. The little dairy on the far right, which is more than 100 years old, has just been demolished.

Continue reading

The Coal Yard & other stories (Part 6)

THE CABLE CARS

The Kaikorai tram with tram sheds behind.

The Kaikorai tram with tram sheds behind.

Up the road a little further was a zig zag track that took pedestrians up the north side to Helensburgh Road and Riding the cable cars always had atmosphere that can not be re lived on modern transport systems. If the weather was cold we tried to ride in the enclosed areas at the back or front of the cars. In fine weather however to sit on the outwards facing seats on either side was much more fun. By the time the cable car had started up a steep part of the track, there was always room for another passenger at the uphill end of the seat. During rush hour the crowds would pile on. Holding onto the straps that hung from over head bars was like a ride in the fun park. Continue reading

The Coal Yard & other stories (Part 4)

Other big Buildings

Along the valley road there were several two storey buildings. Some were houses on the bottom side of the road where the hill dropped down to the Kaikorai Stream. These houses had the lower storey below the road with the front door entrance at street level. At the bottom of Falcon Street was Hunters Store with the cable car going past one side. Mr. Hunter carted the newspapers to the various paper boys who had set areas to cover. Jim Thompson recalls being one of these boys, calling out ‘STAR’ as the walked around the streets.

As well as the coal yard building there was another two storey building on the south corner of Hereford Street. On the other corner was one more where Robertson’s Butcher shop was. Nearer to the Stuart Street corner another housed Nicol the boot maker.

A.Nicol - Boot Maker shop at 14 Kaikorai Valley Road

A.Nicol – Boot Maker shop at 14 Kaikorai Valley Road

Continue reading

The Coal Yard & other stories (Part 2)

Contributed to Kaikorai – Then & Now by David Still

Across the Kaikorai Valley Road, from the coal yard was Taylor’s bakery. During the bread deliveries, Alec Taylor would stop for smoko (morning tea). Alec would take the centre from a loaf of bread and give it to his horse. Then he would butter the crust and eat it for morning tea. At Fraser’s Road, Davie Anderson would fill up the hollows in the ground with the ashes and sweepings from the tram sheds. In this way, Davie made his property and what became Ellis Park, level. Bill Ellis, used to graze his horses on the other side of the flock factory at Fraser’s Road. Continue reading

The Coal Yard & other stories (Part 1)

Contributed to Kaikorai – Then & Now by David Still

At 31 Kaikorai Valley Road stood a large two storey dwelling where William Ellis (My Grand Father, and known as Bill) brought up his family, ran his coal yard, shop and the carrying business. Built as a Hotel, it is believed that it never obtained a licence, but was put to other use. Bill bought the property in 1906 from Mathew Morton and sons who, like several others back to 1885 at least, ran a grocery store there. Bill had previously had a small shop in Swanson Street, which is now known as County Road. Behind the big house were the out buildings, essential to the running of the home and business.

31 Kaikorai Valley Road

31 Kaikorai Valley Road

Continue reading