The Coal Yard & other stories (Part 7)

Schools in the district

Bill and Martha Ellis’s children all attended the Kaikorai School in Roslyn, whereas the Fred and Ellen Still’s children mostly attended Wakari School on the corner of Anderston Road (now Shetland Street) and Helensburgh Road. This school had first started in 1868 as a clay walled building across the Helensburgh Road and was later to become the Church of Good Shepherd.

The first school is the white building on the right hand corner and the newer stone  and brick building is across the road. The Still family lived in the cottage is above  the hedge which is above the School Master's house.

The first school is the white building on the right hand corner and the newer stone
and brick building is across the road. The Still family lived in the cottage is above
the hedge which is above the School Master’s house.

It was while living at this house that Ellen Still was taken to court for striking one of the teachers.

One of her boys had forgotten to take some of his books to school as well as a ruler and rubber. Thirza Sarah Morris was the teacher at the time and had pinned a note onto the boys coat to remind him to bring them next day. On his return he had the books but the note had been removed from his coat lapel. The teacher then sewed another note to his coat with instructions not to remove it.

Ellen removed it but the lad then was given six strokes with a strap. Ellen came to the school and on finding the teacher, pushed the door open and tried to enter the classroom. Thirza tried to stop Ellen and received a slap in the face for her troubles. The headmaster Mr. Moir was called for and the whole episode ended up going to court. The outcome was that the school teacher was made to look stupid and Ellen was given a fine of 5 shillings (50 cents).

The Still family cottage in Shetland Street.

The Still family cottage in Shetland Street.

At the Kaikorai School the Ellis children did very well in most subjects.   Alma said that the main prize she earned each year was for attendance.

Left: Attendance Certificate. Right: School play with Alma second from left

Left: Attendance Certificate. Right: School play with Alma second from left

(Original Article by Allan Gilchrist)

Ross

1 comment

  1. George Hepburn (1803 – 1883) of Wakari House (out of shot to the right in the top photo) was intensely interested in education, and along with his near neighbour James Marshall and others, he was a key member of a committee that worked successfully for the establishment of Wakari School in 1858 (not 1868). These two gentlemen were two of my great great grandfathers

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